Tad Anderson

Subscribe to Tad Anderson: eMailAlertsEmail Alerts
Get Tad Anderson: homepageHomepage mobileMobile rssRSS facebookFacebook twitterTwitter linkedinLinkedIn


Top Stories by Tad Anderson

When the agile movement re-cast the roles of the SDLC they did so with small projects as the baseline of their experience. A typical minimal SDLC method includes subject matter experts (those who execute the current workflow activities), a Project Manager, a Business Analyst, a Software Architect, UX specialists, Developers, DBAs, and Testers. A Scrum Team consists of a Product Owner, the Development Team, and a Scrum Master. The typical SDLC method responsibilities for activities, and the skills needed to get them done, went from 8 roles down to 3. For small projects that is great, but as the industry is learning the hard way, for bigger projects it just doesn't cut it. The product owner role received a lot of responsibilities. This means they also are expected to have a lot of skills. By no fault of their own, this is not usually the case. Along with the lack of ... (more)

Book Review: Microsoft Expression Blend Unleashed

I have not taken the time I should have to get to know Microsoft Expression Blend like I should know it. I use it a lot to build user interfaces and to create SketchFlow prototypes, but I knew I was not fully aware of its capabilities. My hopes for this book where that it would get me up to speed. I am happy to report that Microsoft Expression Blend Unleashed has provided me with the insight into the Blend tools I was looking for. The book is in full color so it is a pleasure to read and the author has a great writing style. The book starts off with a history of Expression Blend, t... (more)

Pro .NET Best Practices Book Review

I personally do not find software development an art form. It is not an unpredictable activity driven by crazy business users that come to work every day inventing a new way to operate their businesses just to savagely changing your requirements. Project teams that use changing requirements as an excuse for their dates constantly slipping and bugs being pushed to production are simply not good development teams and they are poorly managed. Even when you're in an environment where requirements are volatile, proper architecture and process engineering can level the playing field. O... (more)

Book Review: C# 4.0 The Complete Reference

This book is all about C# the language and some of the .NET Framework class library. It is broken into two parts. Part I introduces C# with a view into the language's history. It then spends 19 chapters covering C# in detail. It begins those chapters with an introduction to object oriented programming, encapsulation, polymorphism, and inheritance. Part II digs deep into the .NET Framework's System namespace, collections, multithreading (including the Task Parallel Library and PLINQ), and networking. I have listed the book's chapters below. Part I: The C# Language Chapter 1. The Cre... (more)

Book Review: ATDD by Example

If you are interested in Acceptance Test-Driven Development, Behavior-Driven Development (BDD), Specification by Example, Agile Acceptance Testing, or Story Testing this is a great place to start. The book is broken down into three parts. The first two are end to end case studies showing how to execute Acceptance Test-Driven Development. The first case study is with a team and the second one is the reader working with the author to develop a solution. Part one builds an online parking cost calculator. It introduces specification workshops, wishful thinking, and collaboration as key... (more)